By: Ray Day

CONTACT:

Ray Day
ray.day@stagwellglobal.com 

We wanted to share our latest consumer and business insights, based on research from Stagwell. Among the highlights of our weekly consumer sentiment tracking:

BUSINESS LEADERS MUCH MORE OPTIMISTIC THAN CONSUMERS

The economic outlook is quite different depending on whether you speak with business leaders or individuals, according to our fifth annual 2024 Milken Institute-Harris Poll Listening Project.

  • 81% of business leaders believe the U.S. economy is strong, 84% are optimistic about their industry’s future, and 81% are optimistic about their company.
  • In contrast, only 40% of Americans believe that the economy is strong, and 72% say “economists say things are getting better, but we’re not feeling it where I live.”
  • AI is the second most disruptive issue for a company today – with 87% of business leaders calling it very or somewhat disruptive, along with financial uncertainty (88%), cybersecurity (84%), changing generational values (82%) and inconsistent government policies (82%).
  • 73% of Americans believe the country is losing its global leadership position, and 69% say “America is no longer competitive in the global economy.”
  • 71% of Americans believe “innovation is bubbling up in local communities, but national media is missing this story.”

 

MOST UNPREPARED FOR BUSY HURRICANE SEASON

The 2024 Atlantic hurricane season is expected to be the strongest in recent years, yet more than half of Americans (52%) would only have enough food in their home for one or two days if there were a widespread power outage, according to our Harris Poll research with Generac.

  • 71% of Americans would be concerned with food spoilage if their home experienced an extended power outage.
  • 50% would struggle financially to replace perishable food lost due to an extended power outage.
  • 36% have medical devices powered by electricity that they or someone in their home use daily.
  • 77% of pet owners are willing to risk their own comfort to stay with their pets at home during extended power outages.

 

20 YEARS TO PAY OFF STUDENT LOANS

Most Americans believe it will take more than two decades to pay off their student loans, according to our Harris Poll research with Northwestern Mutual.

  • Americans saving for college think it will cost more than $77,000 – a debt they don’t expect to pay off until age 45.
  • 2 in 10 Americans who are saving for higher education for a loved one are simultaneously paying off their own college loans.
  • Americans’ personal non-mortgage debt edged higher this year to nearly $23,000 – after several years of paying down debts. The leading source is credit cards.
  • Millennials and Gen X have the most debt, and many say they’re carrying their highest level of debt ever.
  • 40% of Americans do not have an emergency fund.

 

FUTURE OF NEWS

Stagwell is hosting the “Future of News Summit” next Wednesday, May 15 in New York. The summit is the culmination of groundbreaking Stagwell research on journalism and advertising. While news is the foundation of a thriving democracy, advertising tied to certain kinds of news is increasingly being attacked under the banner of “brand safety.” This has been used to scare businesses into pulling back from news advertising, which, in turn, is weakening the journalism model.

  • Along with an overview of the research findings, the summit will include award-winning journalists and top brand leaders who will discuss the continued power in news driving strong business results.
  • Among the leaders joining are: Hannah Beckler, Business Insider; Jason Conti, Dow Jones; Jason Rezaian, The Washington Post; Megan Twohey, The New York Times; Tara Carraro, U. S. Steel; Will Doherty, The Trade Desk; Dan Gardner, Code and Theory; Shenan Reed, General Motors; Lou Paskalis, Ad Fontes Media; Mark Penn, chairman and CEO, Stagwell; and Ray Day, vice chair, Stagwell.
  • Want to know more about Stagwell’s commitment to news? Sign up to receive the findings at this link or reach out to Alexis.Williams@StagwellGlobal.com.

 

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By: Ray Day

CONTACT:

Ray Day
ray.day@stagwellglobal.com 

We wanted to share our latest consumer and business insights, based on research from Stagwell. Among the highlights of our weekly consumer sentiment tracking:

BORDER ISSUES VIEWED AS CRISIS

American sentiment on immigration is boiling over, according to latest Axios Vibes by The Harris Poll.

  • 64% of Americans say the current U.S. southern border situation is a crisis, not a politically driven media narrative.
  • 51% – including 42% of Democrats – would support mass deportations of undocumented immigrants.
  • The survey also found discrepancies between Americans’ perceptions of immigration and facts: 64% wrongly believe immigrants receive more in welfare and benefits than they pay in taxes, and 56% wrongly assume that illegal immigration is linked to spiking U.S. crime rates.
  • Americans strongly support immigration as long as it is lawful, with 65% thinking the U.S. should make it easier for anyone seeking a better life to enter legally.
  • 58% support expanding legal pathways for orderly immigration.

 

MOOD OF COUNTRY REMAINS FLAT

Americans’ views of how things are going remains little changed from last month, according to our most recent poll with the Center for American Political Studies at Harvard University.

  • 34% of Americans say the country is on the right track (equal with 34% a month ago), and 35% say the economy is on the right track (up slightly from 34% last month).
  • 48% say their personal financial situation is becoming worse (compared with 47% a month ago), while 29% say it is improving (compared with 27% a month ago).
  • Top issues for Americans remain immigration (35%) and price increases/inflation (35%), followed by the economy (with a 3-point improvement in perception from a month ago).
  • Right now, Americans are more focused on domestic issues than foreign policy: 59% say this is a time in world affairs that enables the U.S. to focus primarily on domestic issues, rather than spend more on military and foreign affairs (Democrats: 58%, Republicans: 57% and Independents: 63%).
  • 58% say the U.S. does not have the leadership necessary to handle world affairs.
  • 56% support sending $26 billion in aid to Israel; 49% support sending $8 billion in aid to the Indo-Pacific, including Taiwan; and 48% support sending $61 billion in aid to Ukraine.

 

RELIGION AS PART OF DEI RECEIVES MIXED REVIEWS

As employees’ needs and employers’ budgets have evolved, so have DEI teams. Based on our latest Harris Poll research with HR Brew, sharing religious beliefs at work is causing conflict among some coworkers.

  • 67% of Americans think companies should have a formal DEI program.
  • Yet only 49% of employees report that their company has a formal initiative, and 22% are not sure.
  • 43% report having religious/faith DEI programming, yet employees are split over whether or not religion should be part of DEI: 54% said it would be appropriate to integrate it into DEI, while 41% said it shouldn’t – more than those who said the same about disability (26%), race (31%) and gender (33%).
  • Workplace tensions might be driving the split: 41% say that conflicts related to faith/religion have caused tension at their workplace.
  • Also, while 78% of Americans want companies to reflect the diversity of the U.S. population, 49% find the acronym “DEI” to be divisive, based on our previous research.

 

HOW YOU SHOWER SHOWS YOUR AGE

You might think your shower habits are random, yet new data from The Harris Poll reveals that showering is indicative of your age.

  • The older you are, the shorter your shower time: Gen Z spends the longest time in the shower, at an average of 21.2 minutes, nearly twice as long as the 12.3 minutes for Boomers.
  • 17% of Boomers shower five minutes or less.
  • Gen X is mostly likely to take a daily shower (at 69%).
  • Men are more likely to shower in the morning, while women are more likely to shower in the evening.
  • The time of day that a person showers also varies by age group: 51% of Gen X say they typically are showered by 9 a.m., while 50% of Gen Z report showering after 8 p.m.

 

GEN Z LIKES USED HERMES AND CARTIER PRODUCTS

Surging demand for secondhand luxury goods is helping to boost the image of upscale brands Hermès and Cartier among Gen Z, according to our Harris Poll research with Ad Age.

  • Hermès tops our latest Gen Z brand tracker, while Cartier comes in ninth. The tracker ranks brands that made significant progress in gaining attention from Gen Z in the first quarter of 2024.
  • Other brands cracking the top five are Peppa Pig, Firehouse Subs, Coinbase and StubHub.

 

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By: Ray Day

CONTACT:

Ray Day
ray.day@stagwellglobal.com 

We wanted to share our latest consumer and business insights, based on research from Stagwell. Among the highlights of our weekly consumer sentiment tracking:

AMERICANS ADD PARENTS’ FINANCES TO RETIREMENT WORRIES

Americans already are worried about their own retirement, and, now, they are adding their parents’ financial futures to the list, based on our Harris Poll survey with NerdWallet.

  • 36% think their parents will need financial assistance as they age.
  • 22% of Millennials currently assist their parents financially.
  • 37% say their parents do not have the financial means to prepare for the future.
  • 10% say their parents expect them to help pay for things, and the same number expect to need their children’s help financially in retirement.

 

YOUNG PEOPLE DON’T SEE THE STARS IN THEIR FUTURE

Interest in astrology skyrocketed in the late 2010’s. Today, however, birth chart memorizing and horoscope use are waning among younger Americans, according to our Harris Poll survey with Cosmopolitan.

  • 83% of Millennials are “somewhat” or a “total” believer in astrology, compared with 62% of Gen Z and 69% of Americans overall.
  • 95% know their zodiac sign, and 65% believe it is an accurate representation of themselves (75% for Millennials and 61% for Gen Z).
  • Astrology skepticism is highest among Gen Z: 54% say “I judge people who take astrology too seriously” (versus 46% of Millennials who say the same).
  • 81% of Millennials say they have consulted or would consult the stars for guidance on relationships (versus 59% for Gen Z).

 

RECORD ELECTION AD-SPEND NEGATIVITY ABOUT TO BEGIN

If you are in Las Vegas, Philadelphia, Phoenix or Reno, prepare for a nearly 24/7 negative advertising blitz as the U.S. General Election is just six months away, according to the latest insights from Stagwell’s Risk and Reputation Unit.

  • Las Vegas, Philadelphia, Phoenix and Reno will be bombarded the most by a record $12 billion to be spent across media channels this election cycle.
  • Other markets with expected high political advertising and political talk in general include Pittsburgh, Tucson, Missoula, Billings, Boston, Wilkes Barre-Scranton, Butte-Bozeman, Detroit, Los Angeles, Charlotte, Atlanta, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Harrisburg, D.C. and Raleigh-Durham.
  • Negative communications about the economy could not only affect people’s votes; it could depress their willingness to spend.
  • To prepare businesses for the next six months, Stagwell is conducting company briefings with data, insights and recommendations. If your organization would benefit from smart info about the upcoming election, email Alexis Williams to schedule time.

 

2 IN 3 STILL HIDE MARIJUANA USE

Most Americans don’t know marijuana isn’t entirely legal across the United States, according to our Harris Poll with Politico.

  • 59% are surprised marijuana hasn’t been legalized across the U.S.
  • 64% say it no longer carries the stigma it used to have.
  • 68% believe it soon will be as common as drinking alcohol.
  • 77% of marijuana users prefer it to cigarettes, and 73% prefer it to alcohol.
  • 40% report being marijuana users (15% daily and 25% weekly).
  • 62% have traveled to places where recreational marijuana is legal.
  • Despite wider acceptance, 64% of users say they are selective about sharing their marijuana usage.
  • 56% wouldn’t disclose usage on the first few dates.

 

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By
Stagwell’s Risk and Reputation Unit

Welcome to the RiskRep Radar, a newsletter from Stagwell’s Risk and Reputation Unit on what companies and business leaders need to know about the intersection of business and politics.

How business is a key election issue

For the first time in decades, immigration is the number one concern for voters, according to the latest Harvard CAPS-Harris poll. Yet, when asked what issue matters most to voters personally, every demographic group picks inflation and cost increases.

This focus will bring business into the crossfire. With Donald Trump’s tax cuts set to expire next year, CEO pay and corporate taxes will become key talking points for both campaigns. With abortion rights rising to the fore again following Arizona’s recent Supreme Court decision, corporate health care policies could come under increased scrutiny, especially by political candidates looking to drum up outrage.

Equally, businesses with strong ties to China could come under fire.

Based on Stagwell’s experts working inside all the campaigns, Democrats and Republicans will be running hard on the following issues:

A battle of generations, not just parties

Age, not just than partisanship, also is behind several of the issues dividing Americans today. Gen Z is by far the most comfortable with employee activism, and tensions over Israel-Hamas continue to spill into the workplace. Google just fired 28 workers for participating in protests over its Israel contract. Universities have faced most of the criticism from politicians so far, but companies should be ready to be next.

The same pattern is emerging around TikTok. While roughly two thirds of Democrats, Republicans and Independents support a TikTok ban, there’s a wide difference by age. Gen Z (18-24-year-olds) is the only age group to oppose a TikTok ban (57%). At the other end, 84% of those 65 and older support the ban.

Key markets will be swamped with ads creating a negative communications environment

Stagwell’s omnichannel agency Assembly projects a record $12 billion will be spent across media channels this election cycle year. This spending will be highly targeted and concentrated in key markets.

Las Vegas, Philadelphia, Phoenix and Reno will be bombarded the most, followed by Pittsburgh, Tucson, Missoula, Billings, Boston, Wilkes Barre-Scranton, Butte-Bozeman, Detroit, Los Angeles, Charlotte, Atlanta, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Harrisburg, D.C. and Raleigh-Durham.

Importantly, as the election ads heat up, these markets will be inundated with nearly complete negativity – which will make communicating and marketing more difficult than ever. Specifically, negative advertising about the economy could not just affect people’s votes; it could depress their willingness to spend.

It is more important than ever for business leaders to be prepared for this election cycle with bipartisan advisory teams, integrated vetting processes, scenario planning and 24/7 monitoring.

Explore our full presentation on the issues driving the 2024 campaigns here.

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By: Ray Day

CONTACT:

Ray Day
ray.day@stagwellglobal.com 

We wanted to share our latest consumer and business insights, based on research from Stagwell. Among the highlights of our weekly consumer sentiment tracking:

BURNED OUT AND CHECKED OUT

Employees and managers are burned out and checked out by the constant pace of change and new workplace demands, according to our Harris Poll research with The Grossman Group.

  • 76% of employees and 63% of managers report feeling burned out or ambivalent in their current position.
  • Yet managers aren’t recognizing just how overwhelmed employees feel: 89% of managers believe employees are thriving compared with the actual thriving figure of 24%.
  • 58% of burned-out employees and managers strongly agree that they are mentally exhausted.
  • 54% strongly agree that they feel overwhelmed in their current role.
  • Top drivers of burnout with employees are constant change, unnecessary work and turnover.
  • Top drivers for thriving employees include: manager invested in their success (61%); empathetic manager (57%); and approachable senior leadership (53%).

 

AMERICANS SAY PERSONAL FINANCES REMAIN TOUGH

While the news reports say the economy is improving, Americans are not feeling it in their own finances, according to our Harris Poll survey with the National Foundation For Credit Counseling.

  • 32% say they are “just getting by financially.”
  • 31% don’t pay all their bills on time – up from 27% last year.
  • 61% feel most improvements in the U.S. economy do not benefit people like them.
  • 39% of Americans are concerned that their money won’t last.
  • 24% feel they will never have the things they want because of their financial situation.
  • Also, fewer Americans today give themselves an A or B when considering their personal finance knowledge (53% today versus 57% a year ago).

 

UPSKILLING VERSUS A COLLEGE DEGREE

Upskilling could upend the college degree in the next 10 years, based on The Harris Poll’s new “Human Progress” global report with ETS.

  • 88% feel the lifetime value of college is eroding as continuous learning becomes essential to success.
  • 78% believe that evidence of ongoing skill acquisition will be as valuable as a university degree by 2035.
  • Across the globe, however, cost is the number one barrier to upskilling and lifelong learning – especially for women, older generations, the unemployed and those in rural areas.
  • 72% globally would trust AI-generated guidance for improving skills.
  • Yet 71% also worry that AI has the potential to negatively affect learning assessments due to biases and programming flaws.

 

DECLINE OF THE SOCIAL MEDIA INFLUENCER

More than 8 in 10 Americans say fake product reviews and paid influencer posts make it challenging to find honest recommendations, according to new Harris Poll research with ExpertVoice.

  • When shopping online, 44% of consumers feel overwhelmed by the abundance of choices, and 57% feel compelled to continually cross-compare options.
  • 77% distrust social media influencers.
  • 81% are skeptical that social media influencers have expertise in the products or services they are trying to sell.
  • 83% prioritize recommendations from knowledgeable individuals over social media influencers.
  • 55% seek transparency and desire more verified expert reviews.
  • 49% want to see non-paid reviews.
  • 2 in 3 consumers make purchases without consulting reviews.
  • Those who do rely on reviews spend an average of 19 minutes reading at least 11 reviews before finalizing a decision.

 

ALL THE NEWS THAT FITS ON SOCIAL MEDIA

Young people are using social media more than ever for their news and information – and they do not consume news through traditional channels, according to our Harris Poll survey with Axios.

  • Three fourths of Gen Z, Millennials and Gen X use social media to find news, compared with 44% of Boomers.
  • The most popular platforms for news gathering among Gen Z include Instagram (71%), YouTube (69%), TikTok (65%) and Facebook (51%).
  • 44% of Gen Z report consuming news on X and 22% on LinkedIn.
  • At the same time, 65% of Gen Z members are reducing their news consumption to protect their mental health and wellness.
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By: Ray Day

CONTACT:

Ray Day
ray.day@stagwellglobal.com 

We wanted to share our latest consumer and business insights, based on research from Stagwell. Among the highlights of our weekly consumer sentiment tracking:

HOW TO FAIL A JOB INTERVIEW

When interviewing, hiring managers recommend showing up on time and being nice if you want to land the job, according to our Harris Poll survey with Express Employment Professionals.

  • 68% of hiring managers say being rude is the reason an applicant is disqualified from contention.
  • 55% indicate showing up late is a dealbreaker.
  • 53% say dressing inappropriately ends consideration.
  • Hiring managers’ other pet peeves: being uninformed about the organization and/or the position (47%); using unprofessional body language (44%); and not asking questions (27%).
  • Other don’ts: talking negatively about a previous position or manager (45% of hiring managers say this will disqualify you) and answering phone calls or exchanging text messages during an interview (41%).
  • A third of candidates admit they’ve made these fatal mistakes: checked their watches (33%), swore (32%) or were caught in a lie (28%).

 

GET READY FOR THE POLITICAL AD ONSLAUGHT

2024 will be the most expensive U.S. election cycle ever – with an estimated $12 billion spent across media channels, according to Stagwell’s Assembly agency.

  • 65% of political spending this season is expected on traditional TV, followed by streaming TV (13%), social media (12%) and radio (10%).
  • While spending overall will be a record, ads will be centered on a few key markets: Las Vegas, Philadelphia, Phoenix, Reno and Pittsburgh are the top five using Assembly’s Market Intensity Index, which evaluates expected political spending. 
  • The discussion on AI-created political ads is making headlines, yet the continued shift to streaming and digital is the big political advertising story of 2024.
  • DIGGING DEEPER: Stagwell’s Risk and Reputation Unit leaders will discuss the latest issues from the campaign trail and the political advertising environment during a free 30-minute webinar at noon ET Thursday, April 18. Email Alexis Williams for an invitation.

 

AMERICANS ARE EXHAUSTED BY NEGATIVITY

Americans are finding it harder to have fun, are hanging out less and are fatigued by divisive polling data and a news cycle that spurs division, according to the new National Temperature Check conducted by The Harris Poll for Johnsonville.

  • 80% of adult Americans say they are exhausted by the anger and negativity in America today.
  • 89% would like to see less negativity in the news and social media.
  • 60% say having fun with people has become harder.
  • 67% are hanging out with people less than they did five years ago.

 

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By: Ray Day

CONTACT:

Ray Day
ray.day@stagwellglobal.com 

We wanted to share our latest consumer and business insights, based on research from Stagwell. Among the highlights of our weekly consumer sentiment tracking:

MAGIC NUMBER NEEDED TO RETIRE SKYROCKETS

Americans’ “magic number” needed to retire is at an all-time high – rising faster than inflation and up more than 50% since the pandemic, according to Northwestern Mutual’s 2024 Planning & Progress Study with The Harris Poll.

  • U.S. adults believe they need $1.46 million to retire comfortably, a 15% increase from the $1.27 million reported last year.
  • The magic number has jumped 53% from $951,000 Americans targeted in 2020.
  • At the same time, the average amount U.S. adults have saved for retirement dropped from $89,300 last year to $88,400 today – and far below the $98,800 in savings in 2021.
  • 31 is the average age Americans start saving for retirement.
  • Most people expect to work to 65. That varies by generation, however: Gen Z expects to retire at age 60, Boomers at 72, Millennials at 64 and Gen X at 67.
  • 32% of Millennials and 30% of Gen Z expect to live to 100 – higher than the 22% of Gen X and 21% of Boomers who expect to become a centenarian.
  • Among those closest to retirement, only half believe they will be financially prepared for retirement when the time comes (48% of Boomers and 48% of Gen X).
  • 43% of Americans believe they could outlive their savings – highest among Gen Z (46%) and Millennials (46%).

 

PROPOSED TIKTOK BAN DOESN’T CHANGE GEN Z’S MIND

Despite a bill that could ban TikTok in the U.S., support remains strong among Gen Z, the app’s core constituency, according to our Harris Poll survey with Ad Age.

  • 64% of Gen Z are on TikTok daily, compared with 33% of Millennials, 24% of Gen X and 5% of Boomers.
  • 75% of Gen Z believe losing access to TikTok would negatively affect brands (compared with 51% of the general population).
  • 76% of Gen Z believe TikTok advertisements are a good way for brands to reach consumers – and 40% have shopped on TikTok.
  • While 59% of all users believe TikTok promotes content that spreads misinformation, 59% of Gen Z trusts TikTok more than other social media (compared with 29% of the general population).
  • 66% of Gen Z use YouTube daily (compared with 45% of the general population). That is slightly higher than the 64% of Gen Z who use TikTok daily (versus 26% of the general population).
    VIRTUAL REALITY INTEREST CLIMBS

    Virtual reality technology is steadily becoming less virtual and more accurate, according to our Harris Poll research in Ad Age.

    • 18% use VR technology, and 33% have not tried it yet but are interested.
    • 27% have not used it and are not interested in trying it.
    • 65% of those who have used or would like to use VR headsets are motivated by gaming.
    • 51% have used or want to use it to watch immersive content.
    • 47% use VR to simulate travel or other real-world experiences.
    • VR usage decreases with age: 38% of Gen Zers use the tech compared with 28% of Millennials, 15% of Gen X and 4% of Boomers.
    • At the same time, older generations are most interested: 38% of Boomers and X are interested in trying VR, compared with 33% of Millennials and 16% of Gen Z.

     

    CONSUMERS IN THE DRIVER’S SEAT OF ‘WHOLE HEALTH’

    The wellness market in the U.S. is worth $480 billion and is expected to grow 5% to 10% annually. The future is about “whole health,” however, with consumers taking matters into their own hands more than ever before, according to Stagwell’s Assembly’s new Whole Health Navigation Guidebook.

    • A 300% increase is seen in people looking to utilize GLP-1 drugs like Ozempic and Wegovy.
    • 71% of Americans express interest in taking a microbiome test to get personalized diet recommendations.
    • 71% of Gen Z and Millennials are turning to social media to self-diagnose conditions – particularly related to mental health – instead of going to a healthcare professional.
    • 77% of Gen Z athletes that say they feel more connected to others when seeing their friend’s or family’s activities on Strava.

     

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      By: Ray Day

      CONTACT:

      Ray Day
      ray.day@stagwellglobal.com 

      We wanted to share our latest consumer and business insights, based on research from Stagwell. Among the highlights of our weekly consumer sentiment tracking:

      AMERICANS SLIGHTLY MORE OPTIMISTIC

      Americans are feeling a bit better about the country – yet not their personal financial situation, according to our most recent poll with the Center for American Political Studies at Harvard University.

      • 34% of Americans say the country is on the right track (up from 32% a month ago), and 34% say the economy is on the right track (the same as a month ago).
      • 47% say their personal financial situation is becoming worse (compared with 45% a month ago). This view is highest among Republicans (65%) and Independents (49%) versus Democrats (28%).
      • 36% say immigration is the most important issue facing the country, followed by inflation and price increases (33%).
      • From a personal standpoint, inflation remains the top issue (38%, down 3 points from last month).
      • When asked about a ban on TikTok, 64% believe the risks to Americans’ personal and national security outweigh the benefits of using TikTok. This view is highest among those ages 65 and older (85%).
      • 65% support the bill that would ban TikTok in the U.S. if ByteDance does not sell it to a U.S. government-approved buyer.

       

      SNACKING, THE GREAT STRESS RELIEVER

      The world loves to snack, and it’s become the way consumers take their minds off the issues of the day, according to the fifth annual global State of Snacking report from The Harris Poll and Mondelēz.

      • 88% of global consumers snack daily – and 60% enjoy snacks twice daily.
      • The numbers are even higher among younger consumers: 94% of Gen Z and Millennials snack once or more a day; 68% snack at least two times a day; and 33% have three or more snacks a day.
      • 6 in 10 consumers prefer snacks over traditional meals – favoring small, more frequent meals throughout the day.
      • 67% are looking for snacks that are portion-controlled – 5 points higher than last year’s study.
      • 54% are eating more plant-based snacks – 4 points higher than last year.
      • A global favorite: chocolate. 65% of consumers in North America would rather give up social media for a month than chocolate (57% globally).
      • 84% of consumers in North America have been loyal to specific snacks or brands for a long time (compared with 76% globally).
      • 68% seek out snacks that evoke memories of their childhood or past experiences.

       

      1 IN 4 AVOID COLLEAGUES WHOSE NAME THEY CANNOT PRONOUNCE

      Mispronouncing a work colleague’s name – particularly a person of color – is a regular occurrence and a source of office stress, based on our Harris Poll research with Fast Company.

      • 36% of people of color say their names are mispronounced most or all the time (compared with 18% of white counterparts).
      • 33% of professionals of color report experiencing discrimination at work because of their name (versus 16% for white workers).
      • 35% of Americans become anxious when they see a name they cannot pronounce, and 23% avoid someone whose name they cannot pronounce.
      • Conforming rather than informing: 56% of people of color say they have changed their name at work in some way, and 13% have been told to change their name to make it easier to find a job.

       

      SUMMER VACATION = MORE DRIVING

      Spring has sprung, and America is thinking about summer vacations – with more planning to travel by car to save money, based on our Harris Poll survey with NerdWallet.

      • 45% of Americans are planning a summer trip requiring airfare or a hotel stay.
      • We will spend an average of $3,594 on vacations this year.
      • 91% are taking action to save money on travel expenses – with 42% driving instead of flying to their destination (compared with 35% driving last year).
      • 20% will go into debt for vacations this year.
      • 22% will skip a vacation this summer because travel has become too expensive.
      • 43% say recent air travel incidents have made them more wary to fly.

       

      STREAM AND CANCEL

      Consumers today are confused by all the streaming options, and they’re ready to watch and cancel at a moment’s notice, according to our Harris Poll survey with Ad Age.

      • More than half of viewers subscribe to a streaming service for an individual show and then cancel after watching. The trend is higher among younger people: 63% of Gen Z and 62% of Millennials say they’ve streamed and canceled.
      • Netflix continues to dominate the streaming market: 66% are interested in Netflix’s original content among a list of competitors – jumping to 83% among Gen Z and 74% among Millennials.
      • Prime Video ranks second with 55% interest overall.
      • Gen Z’s second preferred streamer for original content is Disney+ with 60% of respondents selecting it.
      • Second among Millennials is Hulu at 59%.

       

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        By
        Stagwell’s Risk and Reputation Unit

        Welcome to the RiskRep Radar, an every-other-week newsletter from Stagwell’s Risk and Reputation Unit on what companies and business leaders need to know about the intersection of business and politics.

        During COVID, businesses innovated and listened in warp speed. Leaders today need to do so again to create the next chapter of employee engagement and communications, while addressing diverging demographics and values about the future of work.

        A Difference in Values and Diverging Demographics Are Causing WFH Culture War

        Four years into the work-from-home experiment, the culture war is in full swing. Where you work has become a partisan issue.

        Democrats are more likely than Republicans to say remote work is good for employee wellbeing (+13 percentage points), company bottom lines (+15 percentage points) and career advancement (+16 percentage points).

        Republicans are more likely to say that it’s frustrating to hear complaints about in-person work when so many frontline workers do it daily (+9 percentage points); and that work has traditionally been “in-person” and that’s how it should be (+10 percentage points).

        WFH is also a battle of generations. Millennials, along with Gen Z, are leading the WFH narrative and believe they have leverage over employers. In fact, 71% of Millennials believe they could readily seek out a job with higher pay. At the same time, Gen Z has a steep learning curve that WFH is not helping: 82% of managers say new Gen Z hires’ soft skills need more development.

        What the Future of Work Looks Like Now That Everything’s Politicized

        Americans increasingly care more about quality of life than simply climbing the corporate ladder. Employees’ top 2 priorities are to “build financial stability so I can pursue what I care more about” (37%) and to “establish a better work life balance” (35%).

        Younger workers also believe businesses have broken promises made to them during COVID. That includes 67% of Millennials and 54% of workers overall who say they were promised better work-life balance that never happened. And it’s not just young people who prioritize “work to live” versus “live to work.” Of all American workers, 78% say they would be more loyal to a company that gave employees the freedom to choose where they work from.

        What Business Leaders Should Do

        To start, business leaders need to modernize employee communications and engagement. In most companies, more than 70% of employees want clearer views of company strategy. Half of employees want more focus on operational changes and organizational goals rather than macro news and generic business updates. In short, employees want more context.

        In addition:

        Explore the full presentation on the politicization of return to office here.

        Mark Your Calendar: April Webinar on Cybersecurity

        Our next 30-minute, free risk-and-reputation webinar is at noon ET Thursday, April 18. Together with Stagwell’s communications firm Allison, we will focus on how business leaders can build and protect reputations in the era of cyberwarfare and misinformation. To RSVP, email Alexis Williams.

        ICYMI: Risk and Reputation Unit in the News

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        By: Ray Day

        CONTACT:

        Ray Day
        ray.day@stagwellglobal.com 

        We wanted to share our latest consumer and business insights, based on research from Stagwell. Among the highlights of our weekly consumer sentiment tracking:

        FINANCIAL INSECURITY HIGHEST IN A DECADE

        American financial insecurity is at its highest point in at least a decade, according to our Harris Poll research with Northwestern Mutual.

        • 33% of Americans say they don’t feel financially secure, up from 27% in 2023. It’s the highest concern level seen going back to 2012.
        • The reason for the concern: the high cost of living. In fact, 54% expect price pressures to increase this year.
        • Only 9% say their household income is outpacing inflation.
        • A third think inflation will stay where it is, and fewer than one in five expect it to fall.
        • 54% predict a recession this year, down from 66% in 2023 – yet higher among Gen Z (62%) and Millennials (59%).
        • 45% consider themselves “disciplined financial planners,” down from 65% in 2020.
        • While most are focused on cutting costs and saving, 59% said they will either spend the same amount or more this year on restaurants, vacations and entertainment.
        • Gen Z (36%) is most likely to engage in more discretionary spending overall this year, compared with Millennials (28%), Gen X (24%) and Boomers (20%).

         

        EMPLOYEES WILLING TO QUIT OVER CEO’S POLITICS

        A third (36%) of U.S. workers say they would consider quitting if their CEO expressed political views they don’t agree with, based on a new Harris Poll survey with Indeed.

        • Among younger employees, 46% of 18- to 34-year-olds and 44% of 35- to 44-year-olds would consider quitting.
        • 43% have heard colleagues talking about politics in the office.
        • 56% of employees say talking politics in meetings makes them uncomfortable – even higher for women (62%).
        • 18% admit to avoiding coworkers with different political opinions.
        • 40% say politics has affected team morale – higher among for 18- to 44-year-olds (47%) versus those 55 and older (28%).

         

        HEALTH CARE RECEIVES WEAK REPORT CARD

        Two years ago during COVID, The Harris Poll found the health worker shortage was real for Americans. Today, it has become even worse, according to our new poll with the PAN Foundation.

        • Overall, the state of healthcare access among patients with a chronic health condition received a grade of “C,” or 75.8. Looking specifically at five key categories in the scorecard: Access to Care = C+ (78.8); Relationship with Healthcare Professionals = B (84.2); Affordability of Prescription Medications = B- (82.3); Access to Treatment through Healthcare Plans = D- (62.8); and Financial Toxicity = C- (70.7).
        • 48% of patients face logistical barriers to care, including trouble getting appointments (18%) and financial difficulties paying for needed care (13%).
        • People of color (57%), younger patients (70% Gen Z and Millennials) and LGBTQIA+ patients (77%) are more likely to report logistical barriers to care.
        • 36% of patients taking prescription medications said they had taken at least one financially related action to afford their needed prescription medication(s): reducing spending in other areas (15%); dipping into retirement or other savings (13%): exploring discount saving apps (12%); taking on credit card debt (11%); or delaying payment of other bills (10%).

         

        THE CHECK NO LONGER IS IN THE MAIL

        Digital payments are universal, and paper checks are nearly a thing of the past. Our National Research Group’s 2024 Payouts Landscape study with Onbe found that 97% of U.S. consumers use at least one form of digital or electronic payment every month.

        • Top digital payment methods include debit cards (57%), credit cards (55%), electronic bank transfers (40%) and payment apps (38%).
        • 52% will not select any physical payment method, like paper checks or cash.
        • Check use is down to 22%, and money orders have declined to 8%.
        • Arguments against paper checks: takes too long to arrive (47%), inconvenient to deposit at a bank or ATM (45%), too long for funds to show up in an account (34%) and don’t know how to deposit it (16%).
        • Paper checks are becoming so rare that 31% of consumers accidentally have thrown away or lost a check before cashing it.
        • When it comes to security, digital also wins. When asked which types of payments are most secure, 53% say digital/electronic, and 47% say physical.
        • Looking ahead, mobile wallets and peer-to-peer payment apps are set to continue growing in popularity, with 67% (mobile wallets) and 73% (payment apps) of consumers expecting to use these services as much or more in 2024 as they did in 2023.
        • 21% expect to use cash less often this year.
        • 56% expect that they will use paper checks less frequently or not at all.

         

        ICYMI

        In case you missed it, check out some of the thought-leadership and happenings around Stagwell making news:

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