By

Jason Nottee
AdWeek

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A Ted Lasso star and a sports journalist showcase athletes without a brand mention in sight

A brand doesn’t need an ad or sponsorship to prove its worth. Sometimes, it just needs a story.

 

In 2019, Nike and Observatory partnered to ask themselves a question: Why not build an entertainment studio focused on sports and culture? Instead of trying to wedge diverse, relevant stories into 30-second ads selling products, why not make feature films, documentaries, TV series and podcasts devoid of pitches, gear and the Swoosh? Nike’s Waffle Iron Entertainment sprouted from that discussion.

Named for the kitchen gadget that University of Oregon track and field coach Bill Bowerman used to makes Nike’s first running shoes, Waffle Iron Entertainment sought to tell sports stories through the lens of larger cultural events. One of its earliest efforts, the Crackle series Promiseland, followed Memphis Grizzlies rookie Ja Morant as he navigated the National Basketball Association, Covid-19 and the aftermath of George Floyd’s murder. It next project, HBO’s The Day Sports Stood Still, followed basketball star Chris Paul during the NBA’s reaction to the pandemic and social justice protests in 2020.

In June, Waffle Iron and Observatory teamed with AudioUp Media, Range Media Partners and iHeartMedia to create the documentary podcast Hustle Rule. Based on the book Under the Lights and in the Dark: Untold Stories of Women’s Soccer by journalist and award-winning filmmaker Gwendolyn Oxenham, Hustle Rule tells the stories behind professional soccer players’ rise to their sport’s upper echelons.

 

Hustle Rule trailer

It launched on June 23, the 50th anniversary of the Education Department’s Title IX rule prohibiting schools from discriminating based on sex, and concluded on July 28 just before the Women’s Euro 2022 final.

“There was never a sense that this was an advertisement for Nike or anything like that,” Oxenham said. “What blew my mind was that Waffle Iron, from the beginning, was just interested in telling these stories because they thought they were meaningful.

“These are stories that no one had ever heard of, and that didn’t deter Waffle Iron for a second.”

From professional soccer to hockey, from football to boxing and mixed martial arts, storytelling across multiple mediums is now critical to sports marketing. Fans want to hear their favorite athletes’ stories in the own words on familiar platforms without being asked to buy a product.

To get there, sports brands must be willing to forego sales in the short term to create fans and athletes who’ll come back with more expendable income later.

“You can only say so much in a 30-second commercial or a 60-second commercial, but the true storytelling can come through in a podcast series, in a television series, in a film,” said Brendan Shields-Shimizu, Observatory’s CEO. “If you can get consumers saying, ‘Wow, I want to go watch this content because it’s actually interesting and doesn’t feel like an advertisement, but I’ve learned something from it or I felt happy from it,’ that’s where I think brands are going to be playing in the future.”

 

Finding a reliable narrator

Waffle Iron, AudioUp, Range Media Partners and Observatory sought a tone that would resonate with fans. They gave the series its own anthem—”Won’t Stop” by producer and songwriter A1 Le Flare—and searched for a voice to connect the stories while contributing a narrative all its own. They landed on Hannah Waddingham, the veteran actor best known to American fans, at least, as AFC Richmond owner Rebecca Welton from the AppleTV+ series Ted Lasso.

Samuel Brennan, Observatory’s brand supervisor, noted that Waddingham’s experience on screen as well as in West End and Broadway productions gave her command of the podcast’s audience. At points throughout the series, she intersperses stories about her stage career, her Ted Lasso-influenced love of soccer (and the Euro 2022 champion English women’s national team) and her daughter’s love of the game.

“All our eyes lit up, and we all jumped when her name came up, said Observatory’s Chief Creative Officer Linda Knight. “That’s when you know you’ve got the right person, when everyone’s like, ‘Yes, she would be perfect for this.’”

 

 

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Rafael Canton
Adweek

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Looking to highlight what separates itself from competitors, Vivid Seats is going all in on its rewards program.

The ticket marketplace is debuting the first brand campaign for its Vivid Seats Rewards Program, which offers fans a free reward credit for every 10 tickets purchased. To promote the loyalty plan, Vivid Seats, with the help of agencies 72andSunny LA and Assembly, engineered an innovative media plan that gives one of SportsCenter’s most iconic features a new look.

“We’re not just coasting off of our laurels and performance marketing,” Vivid Seats chief marketing officer Tyra Neal told Adweek. “It is something we’ve always been great at, but building the brand side and getting people to come back and want to use Vivid Seats again has been some of the focus of my time here.”

Developed with creative agency 72andSunny LA, the ad features a librarian imagining the endless possibilities of what her free 11th ticket will be. She then transports from the relaxed stylings of a library to the raucous experience of live events such as a music concert or a sporting event.

 

Why it’s pushing loyalty

Customer loyalty has been front and center in Vivid Seats’ marketing plan since it underwent a rebrand last summer and changed its logo. Vivid Seats’ brand messaging has focused on its rewards program, which is one of its differentiators from its competitors. SeatGeek does not have a rewards program while Vivid’s other competitor, StubHub, has an auto-enrollment program that offers perks such as early VIP access or discounts to customers who have spent $10,000 or more on ticket purchases within a 12-month period. TicketMaster’s loyalty program—Audience Rewards—focuses on just Broadway and the performing arts.

The focus on building connections with consumers has seen some returns. Neal shared that Vivid Seats saw upward of a 10% increase in repeat rates for NBA and NHL ticket sales and is seeing similarly fast repeat rates in MLB.

Vivid Seats’ loyalty program allows fans enrolled in the rewards program to earn a stamp for every ticket they purchase. Once a fan has 10 stamps, they gain a reward credit amounting to the average value of the 10 stamps they’ve collected. Vivid Seats also has a tiered system with three levels titled Rising Star, Super Fan and Icon. Through these levels fans can receive ticket upgrades, exclusive access to industry events and other VIP perks.

The power of 11

The spot will air starting tonight, with its debut taking place during ESPN’s Monday Night Football game. It will run throughout the season according to Neal.

As a tie-in to the number 11, Vivid Seats will also sponsor a bonus 11th play on ESPN’s SportsCenter Top Ten, making it the first brand to add an 11th play to the segment.

The media campaign was done in collaboration with omnichannel agency Assembly.

Vivid Seats is also taking over the homepages of publications and official ticketing partners Rolling Stone, Bleacher Report and ESPN on Nov. 11 or 11/11. Additionally, it is partnering with global influencer marketing and technology agency Viral Nation to feature 11 different influencers for its “Real Rewards for Real Fans” social campaign.

Picks and tix

Toward the end of last year, Vivid Seats purchased sports betting app Betcha Sports for $25 million. It rebranded the app as “Vivid Picks” and integrated it into Vivid Seats as one app this summer. The brand is also debuting a separate ad for Vivid Picks in the fall.

“We’re offering fans something that other secondary ticket providers cannot which is not just a ticket, but an experience, especially on the sports side,” Neal said, explaining customers can double down on their favorite teams by seeing them in person and making picks inside of Vivid Picks.

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By

Robert Sawatzky,
Editor, Campaign Asia
Read this piece in Campaign Asia. 

 

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Challenger holding company Stagwell is doubling down on its global affiliate strategy, adding 11 new partner companies to its worldwide network. All but two of the additions are based in Asia where Stagwell has now also opened a second office in Malaysia.   The partners span China, India, Japan, Malaysia, South Korea, Italy, and the UK, extending and expanding the network’s media, scaled content and commerce capabilities. Together, some 1,400 marketing practitioners have now been added to Stagwell’s “functional global footprint.”  

Some of the new affiliates, such as China’s SparkX and 99IE, bring specialty expertise in ecommerce and gaming respectively, while India’s Event Capital and Laqshya Live Experiences bring event and experiential chops.  

If you separate the nine subsidiary partners within India’s Laqshya Media Group, the number of new affiliates grows to 19. Media was a key strategic focus, with BushAd also joining from Korea, digital media specialists SuperDrive and SearchGuru joining from Japan and Malaysia respectively, along with three Chinese media companies, including MarketIn and GIMC.   

Not all these affiliate deals make Stagwell their exclusive partner. One of China’s oldest and largest local advertising groups, GIMC, has a track record of partnering with other groups, including joint ventures with Havas and Hakuhodo. Another new content affiliate, Malaysia’s Kingdom Digital, sold a majority stake to Hakuhodo last month.   The two new affiliates added from Europe, Italy’s Caffeina and Digital Mill out of the UK, are both digital content specialists.  

Stagwell’s chief affiliate officer Anas Ghazi and APAC managing director Randy Duax tell Campaign the new affiliations are the result of a mix of inbound interest, strategic planning around capabilities and geographies, but were mostly driven by tangible activations on behalf of clients.  

The global programme

In total, Stagwell now is nearing 80 global partners in more than 60 different markets in less than two years since launching the affiliate programme. Under these deals, there is no immediate monetary investment – both sides merely agree to cooperate on client work. 

For the affiliates, it expands their scope of opportunity beyond their local market without being forced to work for global clients and projects that they don’t want to. For Stagwell it’s a way to expand its global reach and capabilities without needing to raise capital for acquisitions.  For both sides, affiliation is a trial period to feel each other out, which can be a precursor to eventual acquisition as it was with Brand New Galaxy (BNG), a European-based ecommmerce network that was one of Stagwell’s earliest affiliates before the two consummated their relationship through acquisition earlier this year.  

But the programme is not without risk either. It’s hard enough for holding companies, with all their global connective tissues, to deliver the seamlessly integrated global service they’ve been pitching to clients for years, nevermind asking independent agencies with different cultures and objectives to interpret quality, standards, processes the same and deliver what the client wants on terms financially beneficial to all.  But Ghazi already sees proof in acquisitions like BNG and in the number of new business wins emanating from affiliates, referencing a pipeline of yet-to-be-announced deals.  

“With our affiliate partners worldwide, we’ve been able to punch up to win new business and land account expansions across Stagwell—from Hydraltye in Australia and Mashreq Bank in the UAE to our major Lenovo win across Europe, the Middle East and Africa, Latin America and North America,” Stagwell chairman and CEO Mark Penn added in a statement. “With our model, we’re not just placing random dots on a map, we’re able to provide clients with global execution rooted in local understanding.”  

“It really is working,” Duax says, who explains that not a day goes by without an opportunity from clients pitching a need to expand to another market, or an affiliate referring a piece of business to be expanded out. 

A second footprint in Asia

If many of the new affiliations are the product of client business, so too is Stagwell’s latest landing pad in Kuala Lumpur. A couple of global client wins together with new work for Ink (with Malaysian Airlines) and Assembly will see the latter hire a dozen new people in Malaysia and accelerated the set-up of an office there.  These announcements follow Stagwell’s stated objective last November to expand aggressively in Asia Pacific, relocating Duax to Singapore where he soon after added Coconuts Media as a content affiliate in January.  

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This episode of Is This Thing On? features our Managing Director Andrew Noel and EVP & CMO of Seminole Hard Rock Jeff Hook discussing the iconic brand’s growth, challenges, and maintaining a consistent global brand story. Throughout the podcast they cover:

  • How Hard Rock properties became iconic destinations
  • The company’s multilayered business model
  • Building Unity – a loyalty platform that ties together 140 million guest experiences
  • And much more! 

We’ve included the full transcript of the conversation below for easy reading, and please make sure to have a listen on Amazon, Apple Podcasts, Audible, iHeart, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, or wherever else you get your podcasts!

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By

Assembly Political Media Practice

 

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Via the Assembly Political Dispatcher. Sign up to receive weekly insights here.

Knowing dollars in market is crucial, but what about other important factors? How can we really tell just how fiery a market is, and how much competition advertisers are up against? That’s where AMII comes in.

The below map shows the scale of Assenbly’s AMII values system – tracking 200+ DMAs to uncover key local market insights and implications for determining which DMAs to place spots and how best to distribute them among markets

What’s our AMII Methodology?

The AMII is a 1-10 scale of how crowded we project that a given market will be during the 2022 election cycle. How do we classify “crowded”? We look at multiple factors, including the size of the DMA, the number of races, how stiff the competition is among the races in that DMA, expected outside or issue group involvement, spillover into competitive districts/states, and geographic location of the market within an already competitive state. So, think of 10 as the most crowded, hottest DMA, and those closer to 1 as cooler markets. 

 

Check out our political spending heat map, layered with AMII values for 15 DMAs, ranging from this election season’s hottest markets to the biggest city metros.

 

WHAT’S THE CHATTER?  

Connections & Conversations

What are the most talked about issues in the news? Below is a visualization that shows the top headlines over the past two weeks from the biggest political news handles such as POLITICO, MSNBC, The Hill, and more. Headlines were analyzed and grouped to show connection points between topics taking place across America. 

Key Figures

What This Means

Judging by the size of the conversation (9.2%), women’s rights is still a big part of the landscape as we begin to see the impact of new regulations in a post-Roe world. Brands need to recognize that many consumers have heightened anxiety about healthcare, so an empathetic tone will go a long way.  

Both sides are working to reduce inflation (9.1%) in different ways, from student debt relief and energy conservation to lowering shipping and trucking regulations. Brands can enter the conversation by being transparent around their own supply chain and the ways they’re working towards easing inflation.

In the weeks before the search, Trump (11%) was fading from the news cycle. The investigation now puts him back in the spotlight as new information comes to light. As the divisive conversation continues, brands will need to understand how to navigate these topics while finding middle ground in order to resonate with a diverse audience set.

RATINGS ROUNDUP 

National News Trends

 

What We Know

Broadcast news has seen a decline in national ratings year-over-year. Of the big 3 cable news networks, CNN and MSNBC are seeing double-digit declines, while Fox News has shown a 10% increase in its ratings. Some of this erosion can be attributed to a shift in news viewership to streaming platforms.  

What This Means

In this polarizing political climate, viewership trends tend to follow public interest, whether positive or negative.  This midterm election year, people are turning to cable news, not only for self-education about issues, but also to help reinforce ideals they already hold about the direction of the country.  

NEWS OF THE WEEK

NPR: Maxwell Frost, one of the first Gen Z candidates for Congress, has won his primary

 

What We Know

Frost’s campaign is based on key progressive issues, including Medicare for All, a Green New Deal, student debt cancellation, and an end to gun violence. Mr. Frost’s win illustrates the political appeal of a young candidate who can tap into the urgency of the political moment.

What This Means

Maxwell Frost’s win brings light to an important theme: interest in politics is increasing among younger audiences. Technology has given Gen Z a louder voice than ever and a platform for their activism. And the industry has taken note – midterm political spending has shifted into streaming services and emerging social platforms like TikTok in order to reach this audience. It will be more important than ever to monitor the conversation amongst younger audiences and to keep them front of mind this election season.

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NEW YORK and KUALA LUMPUR, MalaysiaSept. 1, 2022 Stagwell (NASDAQ: STGW), the challenger network built to transform marketing, has expanded its presence in the Asia-Pacific (APAC) region with the opening of its newest global office, Stagwell Malaysia. Stagwell opened its regional headquarters in Singapore in November 2021. Stagwell’s travel content and media brand, Ink, and Assembly, a global omnichannel media agency delivering media and more, will collaborate in the new location.

As part of the office opening, Ink has grown its partnership with Malaysia Airlines to offer sponsorship and advertising opportunities online and offline at the airport, onboard flights, and at home. Ink is actively hiring to support the expansion.

Assembly, which recently won recognition from two of the most prestigious local marketing award bodies, Marketing Excellence Malaysia and MARKies Malaysia, for its leading work in the market across media, will expand its staff to support the growth ambitions of local Malaysian brands and continue to support global businesses in the market.

“As Malaysia celebrates its Independence Day, we are excited to establish our newest global entity in Kuala Lumpur,” said Randy Duax, managing director, Asia-Pacific, Stagwell. “Malaysia’s GDP grew 9% last quarter and e-commerce transactions are expected to grow 25% per year over the next few years. For the kinds of innovative and disruptive clients our network serves and the kind of talent we have in our portfolio, we’re uniquely positioned to amplify brands into, out of, and within Malaysia.”

Stagwell boasts nearly 2,000 employees in the APAC region at agencies including creative network 72andSunny, communications firm Allison+Partners, creative agency Anomaly, global omnichannel media agency Assembly (named the 2021 Media Agency of the Year for Asia-Pacific by The Drum), digital transformation agency Code and Theory, creative collective Forsman & Bodenfors, (named top creative agency in Singapore by Campaign Brief), travel content and media brand INK, multilingual content agency Locaria, path-to-purchase shop MMI Agency, and consumer research agency National Research Group. 

In addition, Stagwell’s innovative affiliate network now boasts 70 active and independent agency brands. In APAC, Stagwell’s affiliate partners include Beyond Media Global (Guangzhou, Hong Kong, Sydney, Taipei), creative agency Enormous (Gurgaon, Mumbai), influencer agency Metric Design Studio (Shanghai), and digital and content full-service agency Serviceplan (Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, Seoul).

About Stagwell

Stagwell is the challenger network built to transform marketing. We deliver scaled creative performance for the world’s most ambitious brands, connecting culture-moving creativity with leading-edge technology to harmonize the art and science of marketing. Led by entrepreneurs, our 13,000+ specialists in 34+ countries are unified under a single purpose: to drive effectiveness and improve business results for their clients. Join us at www.stagwellglobal.com

Media Contact:
Sarah Arvizo
pr@stagwellglobal.com

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    By

    Yariv Drori,
    Chief Strategy Officer, Multiview

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    The overwhelming concern and chatter about the demise of the 3rd party cookie is understandable because so much of our current data landscape relies on it. But, if we stop for a minute and regain perspective, it becomes evident that this change will ultimately be good for brands and their customers.  

    MAKING HOT DOGS OUT OF PROBABILISTIC DATA

    The amount of deterministic, high-quality data available in the marketplace, such as the self-declared information on your LinkedIn profile, has always been scarce and expensive. Demand for probabilistic 3rd party data, which assumes information about you based on articles you’ve read, was born in the shadow of that scarcity, and 3rd party cookies, that facilitate cross domain tracking offered cheap scale. Inevitably, the consequence of that scale was a compromise in quality, as algorithms generated an abundance of probabilistic data for marketers to act on. The problems started when speculative data became the go-to for campaign insights, usurping the higher-quality data that fuels better marketing.    

    I like to use an analogy to the food industry. The amount of pricy solid-cut chicken and beef did not rise at the same rate as the total food available in the marketplace. To meet increasing demand, food processors found ways to turn 1kg of chicken breast into 5kg of “food” in the form of hotdogs, taco meat, and nuggets by mixing it with a cheap volume of corn, skin, gums, and sodium. Marketers have been making hotdogs by mixing strong, consented first-party data with high-volume (and affordable) probabilistic data, ultimately cheapening the effectiveness of their platforms.   

    The internet, as we know it today, is a consequence of the value marketers put on targeting people based on speculative, processed data, with little regard to where the ads are displayed. The humble 3rd party cookie, which allows cross-domain tracking of people by hundreds of data aggregators, is the mechanism that enabled that cheap scale. Why pay $20 CPM on the New York Times when you can target people who have visited the NYT on some unknown site for a dollar? In other words – why pay $5 for a 1kg chicken breast when you can get 5kg of hotdogs for the same price?

    WORKING WITH AUDIENCE SCARCITY  

    As a B2B media company that helps thousands of businesses connect to their niche professional audiences, Multiview is well accustomed to dealing with audience scarcity. Finding the right people on quality media is the name of the game, but quality data that identifies professional audiences is scarce and expensive. Using data manipulation to create scale in B2B can easily result in a big waste of media dollars: algorithms designed to get scale can easily consider a person who’s searching for a ‘chair’ in the abundant broader category of ‘People in market for furniture’, which may sometimes be a legitimate tactic. However, that logic fails if a person is looking for something highly specialized, such as a ‘dentist chair’, for which the available data is very scarce. Challenging a scale algorithm to target people who search for ‘dentist chair’ could easily result in wasted media dollars spent on people who search for any piece of furniture or are looking for a dentist.

    There is no doubt that the loss of 3rd party cookies creates the perception of loss of accuracy, scale, and transparency, but I would argue that what we are set to gain is more than what we are set to lose, because 3rd party data was never as good as the hype, just as processed food will never be better than a chicken breast.  

    As a brand, the best data you have is the data you collect through direct relationships with people – think of it as raising your own chicken. The second-best option is to buy data and media directly from trusted publishers, like buying chickens from a local farmer you know by name.   

    Knowing that, marketers should focus on three things as they prepare for the party after the cookiepocalypse:   

    1. GETTING CONTROL OVER 1ST PARTY DATA. Collect only what you need and do it consensually, while keeping it secure and current. Strike direct relationships with quality publishers that have direct relationships with their readers. 
    2. WEAN YOURSELF OFF THE THOUGHT DATA IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN PLACEMENT. And tighten your whitelist. Cheap scale is only for brands that have budgets to burn. It doesn’t matter how good your data is if you use it to buy an ad placement on an alarm clock app. 
    3. NREMEMBER THAT AT THE END OF THE DAY IT IS MORE ABOUT WHAT YOU SAY, THAN WHERE YOU SAY IT OR TO WHOM.  No data or savvy media strategy can supplant the great creative ideas needed to fuel modern marketing.

    Life after the third-party cookie may be different, perhaps less convenient, and perhaps more expensive – but the detritus it will clear from the marketing stack will be better for clients and for internet users.

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    By

    Farid (Freddy) Dabaghi,
    SVP, Media, MMI Agency

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    Anyone in the world of digital advertising will doubtless have heard that Google last week announced the second delay in their plan to shut down third-party tracking cookies on their advertising platform, this time until late 2024. While consumers and regulators with internet privacy concerns might be justifiably displeased with the announcement, it is largely good news for marketing agencies and brands that advertise on the search giant.

    Google – along with other big players – has been talking about a cookie-free web experience for some years, now, but they have delayed actually deprecating third-party cookies in Chrome, citing feedback from advertisers that have asked for more time to evaluate and test new tracking systems and solutions. Most notable in this arena is Google’s own “Privacy Sandbox,” an initiative launched in 2019 to explore and test alternatives to the cookie, which can track the apps that consumers use, the websites they browse and other personalized data.

    A majority of advertisers have already had to plant one foot in this brave new world, as Apple began phasing out cookies in April 2021 with their “Ask not to Track” CTA, rolled out in IOS 14.5 and Safari. Google, however, given its ownership of Chrome and Android, is the biggest domino in the lineup.

    While the newest delay offers some respite, advertisers are still wondering exactly what they need to do (if Google sticks to the latest timeline) once 2024 rolls around:

    Make a Plan

    In short, advertisers need to map out their “cookieless” plan, now, and stick to it, regardless of what future delays or other announcements may come. Key to these plans will be first party data, as leveraging this data for retargeting and seed audiences will drive more effective media tactics and should be prioritized. Brands, then, should continue to build out their first party data sets, whether they’re leveraged through eCRM/SMS programs, interactive website elements or deeper DMP integrations.

    Creative is Key

    Next, it will be critical to double down on breakthrough creative. As targeting abilities are eroded by the coming changes, creative will matter more than ever; make sure that it is engaging, compelling and drives a clear call to action. When possible, it will be particularly powerful to contextualize the creative to the source. For example, brands should leverage influencers & real people on social media and use high impact or rich media assets on programmatic advertising. It will be valuable, here, to take the opportunity to explore more organic options such as CRM & organic social to test creative before putting media dollars behind it.

    Find Partners You Trust

    Finally, brands should partner closely with their agencies & programmatic partners. Many partners are working on their own universal ID program to face the coming challenges. Given that the biggest player in the game is still testing what a cookieless world looks like, there is, as yet, no proven solution. Brands will be well advised, then, to evaluate options and tailor a solution that best serves their goals.

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    By

    Jared Randall,
    Web Analytics, GALE  

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    A comprehensive digital analytics strategy is vital to running a successful business today. The problem is — it’s not easy to get right. It’s complicated. But it doesn’t need to be. Here are four common problems and solutions to deal with them:

    1. Your website or app doesn’t convert as well as you think it should.

    You have built what you think is a good website or app after months of planning and development. You have put some marketing dollars behind it to increase acquisition, and you are seeing more people visiting your website or app than ever before. The problem is, they’re not converting as well as you think they should. New users are visiting and not buying your product, service, or signing up for your membership program.

    Using tools like Google Optimize or Optimizely can let your users ‘vote’ between two or more options by how they use your website and permanently implement the options they like best. For example, your organization likes a white ‘Buy Now’ button, but your users buy more when the button is blue. You can now make that data-driven informed decision, and everybody wins! Improvement is an iterative process, and we help identify where the friction is and how to optimize those areas with your collaboration.

    2. You can’t tell the difference between web and digital analytics.

    It is important to understand the  difference between web and digital analytics and the importance of each source or platform in a digital strategy. A customer will interact with your brand through many different avenues; from email to search to social, each digital channel serves a purpose in interacting with your existing and prospective customers. Web and app also have their unique attributes and must be approached differently as well as holistically. 

    A customer could interact with a company’s website and its app over their lifecycle, so why treat them as being two different user profiles? By using Google Analytics/Firebase Analytics you can integrate and build robust cross-device and cross-platform measurement plans for web and app platforms, helping to ensure strategies are customer-led.

    3. You genuinely don’t know your customers.

    Many businesses still don’t know the complete journey a customer takes once they visit their website or app before converting or what prevents a prospective user from converting. In terms of your business’s analytics maturity, you still might be stuck in the descriptive analytics phase and only able to answer questions like ‘What happened?’ but not why it did. It is important to be adaptive with your approach and understand the changing consumer landscape, as customers visit through a growing number of channels and don’t always take the path we want them to take.

    With one of GALE’s ecommerce clients, we performed analyses to identify which key pages a customer visits on websites before they convert and where they fall out of the funnel to better understand how their customers interact with their platform. By understanding the most important pages to a user, we were able to set up a paid media strategy around driving users to these pages.

    4. You don’t know what story to tell with your data.

    You have tracking on your website or app, data is coming into your Google or Adobe Analytics console, and you begin reporting on some metrics you think are your KPIs. But there is no story, just a series of disjointed summary metrics. This could be for a few reasons: your implementation is filled with errors or incorrect data, you don’t know what these metrics say about your website, or you don’t have enough information to create a clear picture.

    All data has a story to tell, but you need the right storyteller to extract it, interpret it, and communicate it effectively. It’s important to take time to understand the business, map out the critical interactions a user makes on your website or app, and create a robust plan to get the data you need to share it in a way that tells a story about your users.

    Digital Analytics should be, and will continue to be, a part of your organization’s core decision-making tools. We’re continuing to reach further stages of Analytics Maturity as your ‘Good’ digital analytics strategy has become ‘Not Good Enough’ in a few short years. It’s time to be proactive and take control of your future.

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    By

    Assembly on July 12, 2022

     

    Originally released on

    Assembly Global

    Our 2022 report takes a magnifying glass to global luxury brand egagement in China

    Our 2022 report takes a magnifying glass to global luxury brand engagement in China, delivering four key consumer and market trends at the intersection of technology, culture, and brand experience.

    Hot off the press Assembly is back with its much-anticipated global luxury brand reports. In 2022, we release a first-of-its kind-installment, focused on the market quickly becoming the most critical for luxury brands worldwide: China.

    Download your copy of: LUXE IN CHINA – New Horizons for Luxury Brands

    In 2020, it was reported that by the year 2025, China will contribute to half of all luxury goods purchases worldwide. Two years later and that trajectory is very much on track, as experts expect China to take its place as the world’s largest luxury personal goods market within the next three years.

    Not only are the trends we see in this market relevant to the brands seeking to win the hearts and minds of Chinese consumers – but they also point towards luxury’s future place in the lifestyles of up-and-coming generations around the world.  Where China leads in technological advances and innovation and bold, new experiences, others often follow.

    In the 2022 report, we look at four key defining trends, with insight and examples of successful implementation and transformation done by global brands in the Chinese market:

    Emerging Media Formats

    Our Future in the Metaverse 

    The Evolution of Offline Immersive Experiences 

    New Consumer Engagement Beyond Brand 

    Get your copy today.

    We also look at media investment trends across key luxury categories, as a signal of the continued digitalization of luxe brand experiences.

    While challenging economic conditions and the continued effects of COVID are felt by all, luxury brands are creating vibrant, truly culture-defining moments to create closer connections with luxe consumers.

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